In older properties you normally find that one wall in each room has a chimney breast. These can be very desirable in some instances, but in smaller properties they can often be somewhat of a nuisance as they take up valuable space and restrict where the room furniture can go. In upstairs rooms particularly, unless they have been kept for decorative purposes or the fire below is in use, chimneys are normally redundant. 

Removing chimneys however isnt normally something that you should tackle as a DIY project, and the work is notifiable with your local authority. 

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Removing chimneys without sufficient support is enormously dangerous, and should only be carried out by the professional builder after surveying the chimney properly. You also need to consider where the chimney is situated - particularly if your house is terraced or semi-detached as there may well be party wall implications. 

The benefits to some properties in removing chimneys can be extraordinary. In kitchens particularly, chimney walls can really get in the way of cupboards and could prevent you from installing a kitchen with the wow factor that might make all the difference. 

Removing chimneys isnt for the fainthearted and it can be hugely expensive, but it might really help make your Victorian house more contemporay and appealing. Period features are not to be snubbed, but there is also nothing wrong with sympathetically modernising a property to make it fit for the 21st century. 

This excellent article from Homebuilding & Renovating magazine explains everything you need to know about chimney removal. https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/how-to-remove-a-chimney-breast/