Whirlpool, the makers of Indesit and Hotpoint washing machines, are carrying out a huge recall of certain models due to safety issues around the door locking mechanism.

We are asking all tenants to check their appliances to make sure theirs isn't subject to the recall. The model reference number can normally be found inside the door. 

Hotpoint model code example

You can find more information about this product recall by visiting:
https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/product-recalls/2019/12/hotpoint-and-indesit-washing-machines/

• FML 742P UK Hotpoint
• WMAOD 743G UK Hotpoint
• WMAOD 743P UK Hotpoint
• WMAQB 721P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMAQC 641P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMAQC 741G UK Hotpoint
• WMAQC 741P UK Hotpoint
• WMAQC 741P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMAQF 621G UK Hotpoint
• WMAQF 621P UK Hotpoint
• WMAQF 641 P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMAQF 721G UK Hotpoint
• WMAQF 721P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMAQL 621G UK Hotpoint
• WMBF 742G UK Hotpoint
• WMBF 742K UK Hotpoint
• WMBF 742P UK Hotpoint
• WMBF 742P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMBF 763P UK Hotpoint
• WMEF 722 BC UK Hotpoint
• WMEF 742 P UK Hotpoint
• WMEUF 722P UK Hotpoint
• WMEUF 743G UK Hotpoint
• WMEUF 743P UK Hotpoint
• WMFG 741P UK Hotpoint
• WMFG 741P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMFUG 742 P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMFUG 742G UK Hotpoint
• WMFUG 742P UK Hotpoint
• WMFUG 842P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMJLF 842P UK Hotpoint
• WMJLL 742P UK Hotpoint
• WMSAQG 621P UK Hotpoint
• WMXTF 742G UK Hotpoint
• WMXTF 742K UK Hotpoint
• WMXTF 742P UK Hotpoint
• WMXTF 742P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMXTF 842P UK.M Hotpoint
• WMYL 7151PS UK Hotpoint
• XWA 81252X K UK Indesit
• XWA 81252X W UK Indesit
• XWD 71452X K UK Indesit

If you have a machine that is affected you should stop using the appliance immediately and contact Whirlpool. If your appliance was supplied by your landlord please report your appliance to us via our Report a Repair function on our website advising which model you have, we can then liaise with your landlord and Whirlpool to arrange a repair.

Nottingham City Council has announced a fee increase for their ailing Selective Licence Scheme that was only launched in 2018. In a move that will anger landlords and undoubtedly increase rents further for tenants, the fee from April 2020 for new licences will increase to nearly £900!

The city council claims that the current fee structure does not cover overheads and they need to recruit more staff, which is pushing up the fee. The council have also recently started to add penalty fees to current licence applications if they have had to raise queries. Landlords on the other had are questioning what the positive impacts of the scheme have been after the recent progress report showed very few licenses issued, very few prosecutions, and a huge shortfall in the anticipated number of applications.

With Nottingham’s Selective Licensing Scheme already the most expensive of its kind in the country, the scheme has been controversial since inception. Before launch, the vast majority of landlords and agents warned of rent rises and increased homelessness, and both are appearing to be very justified concerns. Agents across the city are seeing landlords throwing in the towel, which whilst great for first-time-buyers, is only serving to reduce supply at a time when both the city’s universities are over-subscribed and struggling to fulfil their own housing need.

Rent UP

 

Rising Rents

According to research carried out by Zoopla, Nottingham has seen the rents rise at the fastest rate in the country and this is being largely attributed to the licensing scheme. https://www.nottinghampost.com/news/nottingham-news/selective-licensing-blamed-nottingham-reaching-3435063

Selective Licensing is being seen as the preferred method by councils to drive out the so-called ‘rogue landlords’ and improve standards. The problem with the Nottingham scheme is that it is so vast, the council clearly can’t cope with the application process itself, never mind doing the job the scheme is meant to perform. Similar, more concentrated, schemes in other parts of the country have proved to be a great success but those lessons have been sadly ignored. 

 

Pricing your property accurately, and choosing your buyer wisely are becoming all the more important with Brexit looming and lenders confidence dipping. As we saw in 2008 down-valuing now appears to have hit Nottingham and lenders are treading carefully when it comes to property valuations.

Down valuations by lenders, can mean buyers having to pay thousands of pounds extra, up front, or renegotiate their purchase price to avoid the sale collapsing.
“Reduced valuations are often due to surveyors covering their backs, but they are almost impossible to argue with the lender” comments Jonathan Detheridge from Granger & Oaks Estate Agents. “We saw this a lot in 2008, particularly from one lender who at the time offered the most favourable rates, but thankfully it didn’t last very long”

Down-valuing is problem that has been affecting other parts of the country during 2018, but with price growth in Nottingham being strong in 2017-18 it appears that lenders are now sharpening their pencils and adopting a more cautious approach.

See BBC story below from July 2018

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44202542

Rising rent prices across the country show no signs of abating with prices in the north showing larger increases than in the south.

The ARLA Private Rented Sector (PRS) report shows the number of tenants experiencing rent rises fell marginally in September, but 58% of the agents that responded stated that rents on the whole are still going up. Year-on-year, the figure for rent rises is up from 27 per cent in September 2017 and 31 per cent in September 2018, as they remain high. Tenants in the North East of England were the worst affected with 86 per cent of agents witnessing an increase in rent prices.

In Nottingham, rents have risen consistently for the past three years, driven in no small part by Selective Licensing, Landlords exiting the market, huge student numbers, and more recently by the Tenant Fee Ban. 

Properties in the city appear to be seeing the highest rises as demand massively outstrips supply, and agents across the city are increasingly fully let. 

See the full ARLA report here. https://www.arla.co.uk/news/october-2019/no-relief-for-tenants-as-rent-costs-remain-high/

After many months of deliberation The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) has announced that mandatory five-year electrical installation checks on private rented housing in England will be introduced in the coming months.

In a surprisingly sensible manner, the government are introducing the legislation in a 2 year staged process to give landlords plenty of time to fulfil the requirements. In year one, all new private tenancies will be affected, and in year two all existing tenancies will come within the scope of the scheme.

The implementation date has not yet been clarified, but MHCLG has stated its intention is to introduce the legislation as soon as parliamentary time allows. Landlords and agents will then be given at least six months to familiarise with the new legislation before it comes into force.

Properties that already have a valid electrical installation condition report (EICR) will not need to replace it until five years have passed since it was issued.